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Since our charter in 1921, our American Legion Post has been welcoming VETERANS from all branches of our Armed Forces. Today, we continue to welcome all military personnel serving our country. Joining our Post enables you to continue serving your God, Country and Community. Our mission is to implement the goals, aspirations, dreams, peace and blessings for our country, friends and families.

THE AMERICAN LEGION


RICHARD DINGLE POST NO. 98

328 – E. Broadway St. Paul Park, Minn. 55071

BRIEF HISTORY OF RICHARD DINGLE POST #98

A.    On August 20th, 1919 the First Meeting was held in St. Paul Park to make application for a Temporary Charter in the American Legion. Present were: Mr. Harrison Fuller, State Chairman and Mr. George Chapin, State Secretary of the Department of Minnesota American Legion. Seventeen (17) members signed the application for a Temporary Charter. The first meeting was held in the I.O.O.F. hall in St. Paul Park.

MEMBERS SIGNING THE APPLICATION           

Albert Nollett     Edward Labathe     Louie Peters     George Mueller     L James Tibbetts     Elmer Miller     Theodore Nollett

Louis Fritz     Nicholas Lemmer     Willis Kemp     Frances Daggit Jr     Charles Tripp     George Lemmer     Maurice Mungiz

Anton Johnson     Charles McLain     Antonio Hartenstien

B.    Albert Nollett was elected as Chairman and later elected as the first Commander of St. Paul Park Legion Post. Earle Fourte was elected as the first Adjutant and Anton Johnson was elected as the first Secretary Treasurer. Tony Hartenstein and Albert Nollett were elected to represent the St. Paul Park post at the State Fair convention.

C.    December 8th, 1919 the constitution was adopted as read. Motion was made and carried that at the request of the Dingle family the name of the post be changed to the Richard Dingle Post at the meeting held on April 7th 1921. A special meeting was held on May 22nd, 1921, whereby the official name was changed to the Richard Dingle American Legion Post #98.

D.    Application was made on July 2nd, 1921 for a permanent charter. Constitution and bylaws of the Third District were read and approved as read by the Post at the December 1st, 1921 meeting. At the February 2nd, 1922 meeting, joining the 40/8 was discussed. At the April 6th, 1922 meeting it was approved to purchase the first colors made of silk. In the year 1922, 21 members were in good standing. In the year 1923, 20 members were in good standing. In the year 1924, 22 members were in good standing. In the year 1925, 16 members were in good standing.

E.    During the years that followed the first meeting of the Richard Dingle American Legion Post #98, meeting places were as follows: The I.O.O.F. Hall; The Catholic Church basement; the Headquarters of Company 3rd Battalion 6th Regt. Minn. National Guards; The Newport Town Hall; The boy scout Cabin; The Red Rock Hall; The St. Paul Park Gun Club and later the Legion Post and camp Grounds; the Farmers Terminal Bank; The Newport Motor Inn; The residences of Post Members; and later at the Old Norris Grocery which is now the present address and home of Post #98 in St. Paul Park, MN.

F.    During the meeting held on April 21, 1942, the Constitution of the Last Man’s Club was read by commander Pabst and voted upon to adopt. During the 3rd District Convention held on July 21st, 1942 past commander of Post #98 was elected as 3rd District Commander. During the August 1942 meeting plans were made to purchase or make necessary repairs to the St. Paul Park Gun Club, later it was purchased. During the August 1944 meeting the Post received the National Americanism Commission Award. Reorganization of the St. Paul Park Gun Club and the use of the Legion Camp Grounds were made. In August 1950 a motion was made and seconded to sell the Club House and Camp Grounds for a price of $8,500.00. In December 1951, the Legion Club House and Camp Grounds were annexed by St. Paul Park from the city of Newport. During the January 1964 meeting it was discussed to check on the purchase of the Old Norris Grocery Store as a new Post home. In September 1964 the First House Committee was formed; a new flag pole was purchased, and a flower fund was set up for the sick and persons in distress. During the May 1966 meeting a motion was made and seconded to pick up the 1919 Legion Plaque from the Minneapolis Legion Post and install in at the present St. Paul Park Legion Post. During the November 1966 meeting, final plans were made to make an addition to the Post at a cost of approximately $14,390.00. Three more additions have been made to the Club rooms and hall; this included a new kitchen, a new dining room and a new storeroom. Just recently a small poll barn type building was added for additional storage.   

 

MEANING OF THE AMERICAN LEGION EMBLEM

"There shines the Emblem of The American Legion, it is your badge of distinction, honor and service. It stands for God and Country, and the highest rights of man. Of its several parts, each has a meaning."

Every part of The American Legion Emblem has a meaning, a rich symbolism that a glance does not reveal.

The Rays of the Sun form the background of our proud Emblem, and suggest that the Legion's principles will dispel the darkness of violence and evil.

The Wreath forms the center, in loving memory of those brave comrades who gave their lives in the service of the United States, that liberty might endure.

The Star, victory symbol of World War I, signalizes as well honor, glory and constancy. The letters U.S. leave no doubt as to the brightest star in the Legion's star.

Two Large Rings the outer one stands for the rehabilitation of our sick and disabled buddies. The inner one denotes the welfare of America's children.

Two Small Rings set upon the star. The outer pledges loyalty and Americanism. The inner is for service to our communities, our states and the Nation.

The words AMERICAN LEGION tie the whole together for truth, remembrance, constancy, honor, service, veterans affairs and rehabilitation, children and youth, loyalty, and Americanism.

 

A Women's Auxiliary of American Legion Post ____ was formed on _______. The Legion has every reason to be proud of it's Auxiliary.  Auxiliary members are always anxious and willing to co-operate in every Legion activity.

Sons of the Legion for American  Legion Post ____ was formed on _______.  The Legion has every reason to be proud of it's Sons of Legion unit, which gained statewide recognition because of it's programs of service.

Memorial Day

The American Legion Post 98 and the Cottage Grove VFW Post 8752 has been a leader in this community in the area of Honoring the Fallen Veterans; which involves the Cemeteries in St. Paul Park, Cottage Grove and Newport in Washington County. Each year, active members post Honors by a Memorial Service complete with Honor Gaurd and place a flag on each Veteran's grave.

Join Us and Keep this History Alive

 


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